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Ken Goldstein: What's Eating Brother Elon?

Let’s start with what needs to be said before all else: I am an enormous fan of Elon Musk. I think he is quite likely the most important and visionary entrepreneur today leading the way in technology, business, and innovation. He walks in the American continuum of Edison, Disney, Gates, and Jobs. I wrote as much in a post dating back to 2014. So when a guy as brilliant as Musk goes sideways, I start to ask myself some questions. Like, what’s up with all the weirdness? Clearly I have no ability to understand what’s going on in this amazing individual's life, other than to observe the monumental toll that stress can take on even the mightiest of titans. To guess at what might be at the root o

Peter Murphy: Writing about Siblings

In previous posts I have discussed various aspects of writing about family, and I hope they have been of value to readers. In this post, I will share my observations on what I consider to be the trickiest task of the group: writing about siblings. Now, maybe you grew up in a family where all the siblings lived in glorious harmony every single day. If you did, well . . . good for you. Most of us have had very different experiences. Yes, siblings can love each other, but when thinking on that I always remember the line from Oscar Wilde’s THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST: “Women only call each other sister after they have called each other a lot of other things first.” Having grown up as the you

Peter Murphy: A Few Helpful Tips on Raising Writers

In this ongoing series of posts, I, without expertise, prejudice, or agenda, will share my insights and/or observations on writing about family. The previous posts were on a more general level so in this one, let’s dive into the heart of the matter that is children writing about their parents and what parents can do to avoid the worst-case scenarios. Writing about terrible childhoods has been done to death, but as long as people are foolish enough to reproduce, there will be those offspring who will grow to be writers with scores to settle. And there will be readers who will devour the resulting stuff. Now, having been someone’s child, and then someone’s parent, I have an evolving view on bo

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